Weekend Movie Marathons: An Introduction 

“Time flies when you’re having fun”…isn’t that what they say?? Well, to be honest I’m not sure how much fun I’ve been having (especially the past year & a half), but that first part is certainly true. It occurs to me that it’s been ten years since I completed the lengthiest project I’ve ever done in this space…my list of 100 Favorite Movies. That series was so much fun, and in the years since I have followed it up with things like 80’s Movie Mania, 90’s Film Frenzy, & Merry Movie Mayhem. What can I say?? I don’t have a wife or girlfriend, no children (that I’m aware of), and lead a rather prosaic existence, so I love movies. I had thought when we did the 100 Favorite Movies that I might update it in about decade or so because I know that taste evolves, and indeed it has. Looking back at that list I’d guess that atleast a dozen or so wouldn’t make the cut now, several films that I didn’t appreciate back then would be given some love now, and of the ones that remain many would be reshuffled…either dropping down a few spots or rising exponentially. However, one of the things that I have realized thru the years is that movies are…atleast for me…kind of a mood thing, and oftentimes seasonal. So was it even fair to rank them 1 to 100?? What’s done is done and I regret very little of what I wrote back then, but I think a fresh approach is required. 

In 2014 I presented the idea for a Weekend Christmas Movie Marathon where we packed over two dozen films & TV specials into 17 viewing hours over the course of two & a half days. Seven years later that sounds exhausting. My attention span seems to have grown shorter as I’ve aged, and I have learned that less is more. So we are going to do things just a bit different for this project, which is open ended and will continue as long as I choose, with new additions being made at my leisure. No pressure. No time constraints. No predetermined intervals of frequency. 

Here’s the concept…..

What I have discovered about myself is that I gravitate toward certain actors & directors. There are film categories & sub-genres that I enjoy and those that I absolutely do not. I suppose that’s not unusual or groundbreaking. Most of y’all are probably the same way, it’s just that I’m a writer with enough spare time for self reflection and a convenient space to kvetch about it. So what I’ve done is choose my favorite filmmakers and decided to create a weekend movie marathon for each of them. However, this time we won’t be watching wall to wall films for hours upon hours. We’ll choose only five…one for Friday, Saturday , Sunday night as well as Saturday & Sunday matinees. I think that is more than doable. 

Looking back at the Christmas Marathon I have to chuckle at how things have changed in seven years. First & foremost I no longer have my sweet & cuddly Rocco, who left this mortal coil in October 2019. That doesn’t affect things one way or another when it comes to movies except I don’t have him to snuggle with anymore. Technology is the big change. In 2014 I wrote about preparing for such a marathon by recording things off television, buying DVDs, or going to Redbox. Nowadays I have no doubt that we can stream anything we want as long as we have access to those channels. Most people probably have Netflix, Hulu, & Amazon Prime Video, and between those three I am quite sure everything is readily available. As far as ambiance, since this is a wide open situation with no seasonal constraints creature comforts are totally up to the individual. I do have a bigger, nicer television than I did seven years ago, but I’m also trying my best to lose some weight & eat healthier, so snacks would be kept to a minimum in this household. 

Okay, so you get the idea. The first marathon will be presented soon. I would ask for patience & broadness of mind if you don’t understand my choices. I am going to do my best to not be repetitive, so there’s a good chance that if I don’t discuss a particular movie it’s because I’ve reserved it for another actor or director. In the course of preparation I have noticed that sometimes there is a lot of crossover. Something I enjoy might have multiple favorite performers or be directed by someone whose filmography I really like. As always I welcome feedback. Unlike politics or social issues I think movies are a subject that we can have positive discussions and perhaps even amiable disagreements about because it is all in good fun. 

100 Favorite Movies…..11-15

Okay…so I know it’s only August, but today you get two holiday films, with both Christmas and Thanksgiving being represented. It is also another tribute to the genius of John Hughes, as three of his movies show up. I want to take this opportunity to thank my loyal readers who have stuck with this series in the year since it began. When I originally envisioned it I had no idea it would take over a year. I suppose I did not realize I would have so many other things to write about, but I believe that to be a good thing. Enjoy.

 


15 Office Space

I have to give a shout out to a former co-worker of mine, Brad, who brought Office Space into my consciousness somewhere around 2002-ish. Somehow I had missed it when it was originally in theaters in 1999 but I wasn’t alone. Office Space has become a cult classic thanks to home video and television, not because anyone went to their local cineplex and paid $7 to see it. They didn’t. Anyhow, for me the timing of my introduction to this movie was perfect. Brad and I were both supervisors at a despicable telemarketing company at the time, and the plight of Peter, Samir, Milton, Michael Bolton, and the rest of the gang resonated on a myriad of levels. I had never…and still haven’t…read the Milton cartoons, but I was intrigued by the fact that the film’s director is Mike Judge, the creator of Beavis & Butt-head. I was a huge fan of Beavis & Butt-head in college. Needless to say, Office Space does not resemble Beavis & Butt-head in the least, but it is somewhat surprising that Judge has not had wider success on the big screen. Office Space is a look at the day-to-day grind at a software engineering company and focuses on Peter, a miserable white-collar worker bee who realizes that “Ever since I started working, every single day of my life has been worse than the day before it. So that means that every single day that you see me, that’s on the worst day of my life.” Now tell me…who among us hasn’t had a similar thought pattern at one time or another?? I would feel safe in betting that the vast majority of the working population aren’t spending 9-5 at their dream job and that in many ways a lot of people are somewhere along the scale of unfulfilled, unhappy, or downright miserable. And that’s just in their professional life. But this is a movie, so unlike real folks Peter stumbles onto an escape. During some sort of wacky couples therapy he is hypnotized to basically quit giving a damn, but the therapist keels over dead before Peter is completely brought out of his trance. The next day Peter feels happy and relaxed, without a care in the world. Hilarity ensues. The ensemble cast is superb. Peter’s best work buds are Samir, a man of Indian descent who is frustrated by people who cannot pronounce his name, and Michael Bolton, a guy who liked his name until he was 12 when “that no-talent assclown became famous and started winning Grammys.” They work with an eclectic group of oddballs, including muttering milquetoast Milton, who has an odd attachment to his stapler and who was actually laid off years ago but no one ever told him and a glitch in accounting keeps the paychecks coming, Tom, who invents a Jump to Conclusions board game that he hopes will be the next Pet Rock, and Lumbergh, the annoying, clueless, oblivious, hilarious boss that we all have had in one form or another. Along the way Peter gets a new gal pal, a waitress at a chain restaurant who hates her job as much as Peter hates his, interacts with a nosy neighbor whose biggest desire is to have a threesome, gets promoted by The Bobs, efficiency experts who love his frank directness & blunt honesty, and hatches a plan to slowly embezzle money from the company in a way that won’t be noticed. It’s all very absurd yet vaguely familiar, and if you’ve ever had a job you’ll appreciate Office Space as I do.


14 Planes, Trains, & Automobiles

The world’s best Thanksgiving movie, hands down. I suppose there isn’t much competition, but nevertheless Planes, Trains, & Automobiles is a great film. With the combined talents of Steve Martin and John Candy, not to mention uber writer/director/producer John Hughes, how could it not be?? Martin is Neal Page, an uptight advertising executive trying to get from NY City to Chicago in time to have turkey with the family. Candy is Del Griffith, an unkempt salesman who’s a wee bit too extroverted. He is also making the trek from The Big Apple to The Windy City. Unfortunately for both men the journey is far from smooth, with snowstorms, flight cancellations, train derailments, and a plethora of other humorous mishaps turning a short 3 hour trip into a 3 day adventure from Hell, atleast for Neal who just wants to be left alone but can’t seem to shake gregarious Del. As with most Hughes films, the fun is underlined with a slight hint of pathos, but not so much that it becomes mawkish, atleast until the last 5 minutes. But I am willing to overlook the last 5 minutes because of all the goodness that precedes them. Edie McClurg, known to audiences as the secretary in Ferris Bueller’s Day Off and an ever present nosy neighbor in the short lived 80’s sitcom The Hogan Family, has a very memorable cameo role in this movie that singlehandedly takes the rating from PG to R. I am not advocating foul language, but this scene is undeniably funny and belongs in the pantheon of great moments in film. Other than that the supporting cast is inconsequential because the two stars carry the well written story all by themselves. What might have been a typical, formulaic, clichéd “buddy flick” or “road trip movie” is taken to a whole new level in the capable hands of Hughes, Martin, and Candy. It is a shame that the two actors never did anything else together because they make a great duo. In his review of Planes, Trains, & Automobiles critic Roger Ebert said “The movies that last, the ones we return to, don’t always have lofty themes or Byzantine complexities. Sometimes they last because they are arrows straight to the heart”. This is so true, as we are able to see much of ourselves in the foibles of both Del and Neal, as well as the predicaments they share. But above all else we laugh, and as anyone who has read this list thus far knows that is what I like to do and what I prefer in the movies I watch. Planes, Trains, & Automobiles has become as much a part of my Thanksgiving tradition as turkey, football, and the Macy’s Parade, and I would happily counsel anyone to follow suit.

 

13 National Lampoon’s Vacation

Thus far there have been 4 Vacation flicks (and no…I’m not counting that God awful made-for-TV deal they did a few years ago). The second, European Vacation, was forgettable. The fourth, Vegas Vacation, was lazy, ill-conceived, and disappointing. The third, Christmas Vacation, will be discussed at a later time. But nearly 30 years after it first hit theaters the original Vacation is a bona fide classic that has aged surprisingly well. My family was never the vacationing type. The funds just weren’t there, so we took what my Dad calls “The Old Italian Vacation”…a week on the front porch and a week on the back porch. Those of you that have had the opportunity to take a lot of family trips may identify more closely with Vacation than I do, but that doesn’t mean us homebodies can’t appreciate the uproarious misadventures of the Griswold clan. Chevy Chase stars as patriarch Clark, a food additives manufacturer in suburban Chicago. Clark loves his family and wants to take the wife, Ellen, and his two young teenagers, Rusty and Audrey, on a summer vacation. The destination?? California’s Walley World, an obvious nod to Disneyland. But instead of hopping on an airplane Clark decides that he wants to “drive the tribe cross-country” because “getting there is half the fun”. Thankfully the viewers are the ones having all the fun, as the trip is one calamity after another. It begins before the family even makes it out of town, with a shady car salesman tricking the obtuse Clark into buying The Queen Family Truckster, a horrific pea green wagon with way too much imitation wood paneling, 8 headlights, and an air bag that looks like it came out of the kitchen trash can. The Truckster looks like The Exorcist threw up on The Brady Bunch, and the dealer hysterically says “You may think you hate it now, but wait ’til you drive it” . Along the trek westward the family gets lost in the ‘hood of St. Louis, getting their car spray painted and their hubcaps stolen…barely survives Clark falling asleep at the wheel…rouses the entire sleeping population of a small motel when Clark goes skinny dipping with a Ferrari driving babe played by model Christie Brinkley…and makes the mistake of visiting Ellen’s redneck cousin in Kansas. That cousin is married to an even bigger buffoon than Clark. Eddie is a great caricature of lowbrow Welfare culture, and his kids are a chip off the old block. One of them has a box full of pot under her bed and tells Audrey that she French kisses and that “Daddy says I’m the best at it”. The older son, in response to Rusty’s indignation that there are no video games or other modern forms of entertainment, shows his cousin a large porn collection and explains the joy of…self pleasure. Then there is Aunt Edna, who hates Clark for some unknown reason and is in need of a ride to Arizona to go live with her son. Throwing Aunt Edna…and her vicious dog…into the mix just adds to the merriment, and her ultimate fate may be the highlight of the film. Needless to say The Griswolds eventually make it to Walley World, but that too has a fantastic comedic twist. I would probably not be going too far out on a limb to assume that few who saw Vacation when it hit theaters realized what a gem they were seeing and that we’d still be watching all these years later. Part of the credit once again has to go to John Hughes, who wrote the screenplay based on his vacation adventures as a child. I am hearing rumors that a franchise rebirth is in the works, with a grown up Rusty taking his own family on a wacky vacation. One can only hope that it is a properly funny offspring of its predecessor and that we may be discussing it wistfully in three decades.

 

12 Home Alone

The final part of today’s John Hughes three-peat is also another Christmas movie. Don’t say I didn’t warn you. I cannot believe it has been 20 years since little Kevin McCallister was ditched by his family and had to fend off bumbling burglars with hilarious cartoon violence. 1990 was the year I graduated high school and entered college, so it is a very special moment in my life. Viewers had gotten a small dose of MaCaulay Caulkin the year before in Uncle Buck, but in Home Alone he takes center stage as an 8 year old boy inadvertently left sleeping while his family jets off to Paris for Christmas vacation. Now I have to admit, the setup is a bit improbable if only because Kevin’s family includes parents, siblings, cousins, and an aunt & uncle. One can realistically conceive of one or two people forgetting a small child…but upwards of 8-10 people?? One has to suspend disbelief a lot to buy into it, but I will give due credit…the writing is just clever enough that we do buy it. Kevin is doing just fine taking care of himself despite being afraid of an old neighbor fella who, local legend has it, is a serial killer and also getting a little freaked out by the furnace in the basement. Meanwhile, Kevin’s Mom is frantically trying to get back to Chicago to save her poor little crumb cruncher, with little help from local law enforcement or the airline industry. While all this is happening the McCallister’s neighborhood is being cased by Harry & Marv, two inept thieves calling themselves The Wet Bandits. Kevin fools them for awhile, but soon enough they figure out that he is…yes…you guessed it…home alone. Kevin overhears them plotting their pillage of his homestead and decides to fight back. Of course in the real world would a little kid stand a chance against two grown men?? Obviously not. But this is a movie, and Kevin takes care of business quite nicely. There are Hughes’ trademark moments of poignancy and sentimentality, but for the most part the story is ever so slightly edgy. Joe Pesci and Daniel Stern acquit themselves just fine as the clueless crooks, and the family does their part in driving the plot. But make no mistake…Home Alone is all about MacCaulay Culkin. I don’t know how or where John Hughes found him, but I’m glad he did. Hindsight tells us that Culkin was like a brand new car being driven off the lot and immediately beginning to lose value…his star would never quite shine so brightly again. But to millions of viewers every Christmas season, for a brief moment in time, he is and will continue to be that cute, innocent, funny 8 year old boy. Home Alone is required viewing in my household every November & December, and I would encourage anyone to make it part of their holiday tradition as well.

 

11 The Passion of the Christ

I really struggled in deciding where this movie would fall in the countdown. On the one hand, it is not entertainment and was never meant to be. One does not sit down with a cold beverage and a bowl of popcorn on a lonely Saturday night and decide to pop in The Passion of the Christ. However, I do feel like it is an important movie that everyone, especially those purporting themselves to be Christians, need to watch occasionally. The story should be familiar to almost everyone. It is the story of Jesus Christ, His earthly ministry in the company of 12 apostles, His pursuit, capture, crucifixion, and resurrection. The plot and most of the dialogue is taken directly out of the four gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. Director Mel Gibson makes some interesting choices, especially having all the dialogue in Aramaic, Latin, and Hebrew. I am not usually a fan of films with subtitles, but using the original languages for this film was a brilliant decision and makes the story that much more beautiful. The movie generated a lot of controversy when it was released in 2004, but that is par for the course in modern day America. Everything Muslim is cool, along with wacky Hollywood “religions” like Kabbalah and Scientology, but we dare not promote anything positive about Christianity. People complained about possible anti-Semitism because of the inference that Jews killed Jesus. Well guess what?? They did. But folks forget that Jesus Himself was a Jew and the fact that He was put to death by other Jews does not mean that we are to hate the Jewish people or that The Bible teaches that. It was all much ado about nothing. As a matter of fact, as a Christian I know that Jesus died for all of our sins including mine, so when I watch The Passion I am haunted by the thought that I did that…I am responsible for the violent flogging and crucifixion of Christ, and it convicts me tremendously. Bleeding hearts also whined about the violent nature of the film, as if they believe that Jesus was lightly spanked with a feather. The violence is what makes the film work, and I give kudos to Gibson for not holding back. The Passion of the Christ is not easy to watch. The first time I saw it I sat in the theater for about 20 minutes after the credits rolled, unable to move. Nothing I have ever seen outside the death of my own mother has ever rocked my world so deeply. I have seen it a few more times in the ensuing years, but as I said, it isn’t light entertainment that one watches for fun. I do implore every single person who has never seen it to watch atleast once though. It is an experience you will never forget.

 

 

 

 

100 Favorite Movies…..81-84

Because of my “tribute” to John Hughes we kind of got off track with the 5 films at a time concept. Let’s catch up with 4 films here.

 

 

 

84 Apocalypse Now

I’m not really into war movies…they’re just not my thing. I much prefer to laugh than watch people get killed. I think a lot of it has to do with my age. Both world wars occurred before my parents were even born and the Korean War took place 20 years before I was even a gleam in my Daddy’s eye. Even Vietnam ended when I was a toddler. I never had the privilege of serving my country in the military either. So I suppose it stands to reason that war films just don’t resonate with me in any meaningful and relevant capacity. However, there are some exceptions. Loosely based on Joseph Conrad’s novella Heart of Darkness, Apocalypse Now features a dream cast…..Marlon Brando, Robert Duvall, Martin Sheen, Lawrence Fishburne, Dennis Hopper, and a very young and unknown Harrison Ford…..all directed by the incomparable Francis Ford Coppola. That’s a group that could make just about any movie on any subject appealing, but in this case they have superbly written material to work with.

 

 

83 Dirty Dancing

I believe there are a handful…..maybe 8 or 10…80’s films that defined the decade and would need to be put into any 1980’s time capsule. Dirty danceDancing is one of those iconic films, even though it is set in the 60’s . Patrick Swayze would be on the Mount Rushmore of late 20th Century actors, and this is among his best performances. The movie has a bit of everything…..romance, class warfare, great music, drama. It’s the very definition of a popcorn movie, which should not be seen as a derisive term. After all, what’s wrong with a little escapism?? Timing is a key issue here as well. I don’t know if Dirty Dancing is something I would have connected with had it been made 5 years earlier or 5 years later. But it came out when I was 15 and is a definitive moment in my teenage pop culture memory.

 

 

82 Top Gun

topgunTop Gun is another 80’s time capsule necessity starring another icon of the era, Tom Cruise. Cruise, at one time, oozed cool. He was the very essence of how we define the term “movie star”, and Top Gun was his crowning achievement. I suppose it’s debatable as to whether he changed or I just grew up and began understanding that actors have more than their fair share of unique shortcomings. Nevertheless, I give credit where credit is due and will always fondly recall several of his better roles. It’s unlikely that Top Gun is a very accurate portrayal of Navy life, but it’s a fun story with a good mix of action for the guys and romance for the ladies, one of those “a little something to interest everyone” rarities.

 

 

81 Trapped In Paradise

I know some will see Trapped In Paradise on this list and think I’ve lost my mind. But in the introduction to this series I made it clear that these are my favorite films, not the greatest films of all time. And while I take pride in what I believe to be pretty good taste I will also readily admit that sometimes my heart falls for something that my head tells me isn’t really that good (and no, we haven’t suddenly segued into discussing my love life). Two things must be said in defense of my affection for this early 90’s Nicolas Cage/Dana Carvey/Jon Lovitz dramedy. First of all, it’s a Christmas movie, and I love love love Christmas movies. They have a warm and fuzzy, timeless quality…..atleast most of them. Secondly, I remember seeing this film as if it were yesterday. I had just graduated college. My two best friends and I were hanging out at my apartment and decided to venture to the video store a few blocks down the street. One of the videos we ended up with was Trapped In Paradise. It was silly and funny and I was enjoying it with two people who were like brothers to me…..interesting since the movie is about three brothers. Not long after that I would move away and a very special chapter in my life would end. I look back now and realize just how extraordinary those years were. So yes, Trapped In Paradise may not be critically acclaimed or even be a very good movie, but for me it represents a moment in time forever frozen in my mind and fondly imprinted into my soul. But even for the other 99.999% of the population who don’t have any kind of emotional attachment it is still an eminently watchable and I daresay enjoyable flick for a cold winter night when you’re sitting under a blanket, sipping hot chocolate, and enjoying the soft glow of twinkling lights emanating off your tree.

 

 

 

 

 

100 Favorite Movies…96-100

Before we begin, I feel the need to clarify my thoughts on something. A list like this isn’t easy to assemble. I don’t mean that it is difficult in the grand scheme of life. Certainly there are more important issues that we deal with on a daily basis, and there are deeper things on which we can spend our time pondering. But quite frankly I find people who are unable to relax and have fun just a tad bit irritating. How one spends “down time” is an individual choice, and in 21st century America we have an abundance of options. I am fully aware that some folks are movie buffs and some find such entertainment mundane and beneath the pedestal upon which they have placed themselves. The latter group will find this list uninteresting. So be it. But the armchair critics and couch potatoes among you will hopefully find my choices worth the read, and will also appreciate the delicate complexity involved. So without further adieu…..the first five choices on the list:

 

 

 

100 Caddyshack
AFI rated the Bill Murray/Chevy Chase classic ode to golf and class warfare at #71 on their 100 Greatest Comedies list. I suppose a lot of folks would have it rated higher on their list and mine. Sometimes I think enjoyment of a movie is all about timing. Where one first sees the film and under what circumstances, how many times they’ve seen it, what year it came out in relation to the viewer’s age, and other correlations. I was only 8 when Caddyshack was in theaters, and it was Rated R. But many people have come to adore it through the magic of television and video, and there are older films that I find immensely pleasurable, so the timing issue doesn’t fully explain why I rate it dozens of spots lower than the majority likely would. I also believe that everyone’s sense of humor is different and that we “get” certain things while others just go completely over our head. Bill Murray is someone whose humor just never really bowled me over, and his legendary performance in Caddyshack made his career. Actually, I would go so far as to say it IS his career. Anyway, I do enjoy the movie which is why it’s on the list. I just may not enjoy it as much as you do. And the sequel that was made eight years later which is disparaged by most, especially fans of the original…..well, I don’t think it’s all that bad, probably because I don’t have the first one on such a high pedestal.

 

99 E.T. the Extra Terrestrial
It wasn’t Spielberg’s first venture into the world of sci-fi (remember Close Encounters of the Third Kind??), but it is his most beloved. This is a perfect example of circumstances shaping one’s opinion. I’m not positive that E.T. was the first movie I ever saw in a theater, but I distinctly remember seeing it in a theater with my mother and sister, and I know it’s one of only three movies (we’ll get to the other two much later in this process) that have ever brought tears to my eyes.

 

98 Fast Times At Ridgemont High
If one needed to procure items for a 1980’s time capsule a copy of Fast Times would be a must. It is the quintessential high school flick and launched the careers of Sean Penn, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Judge Reinhold, Phoebe Cates, Forest Whitaker, Nicolas Cage, Anthony Edwards, and Eric Stoltz. There are 3 Academy Award winners in that list ladies and gentlemen. That’s impressive. I’m not a Sean Penn fan by any means, but with Spicoli he created one of the most original and enduringly funny characters in American cinema. And if Phoebe Cates never does another thing in her life (and let’s be honest…..her career after Fast Times hasn’t exactly been noteworthy), she will be immortal to generations of randy teenage boys who’ll never forget her coming out of that pool.

 

97 Risky Business
Once upon a time Tom Cruise was the living breathing definition of cool, and this is where it all began. Sure, he’d been in some other quasi-memorable flicks (Taps, Losin’ It, The Outsiders, Endless Love), but the roles were all pretty insignificant. With Risky Business, a tale about a high school boy-next-door type turning his house into a brothel while his parents are away on vacation, Cruise burst onto the scene and over 25 years later is still around. One key element to a good movie can be a memorable scene or two, and all anyone has to say to evoke a smile when it comes to Risky Business is “Old Time Rock n’ Roll” or “El Train”. That kind of positive notoriety is the envy of about 99% of all entertainment produced these days.

 

96 School of Rock
I typically shy away from holding newer movies in any kind of high esteem. I like to see if it has staying power, if it’ll make me laugh or give me as much pleasure the tenth time I’ve seen it as it did the first time I watched. There are exceptions to the rule though. I like Jack Black. He’s funny and creative. Put him in a role where there’s good music involved (and good music is the central backdrop of School of Rock) and the combination is irresistible.

Introduction to My 100 Favorite Movies

Popcorn - 46/365

Some time ago I published a series of blogs at the old Manofesto about my Top 100 Movies. Since I’m here at this site now I have decided to revise the list ever so slightly and expose it to a whole new audience. My original plan was to only modify and redo the list about every 5 years thereby giving my tastes time to evolve, but this will be a onetime exception to that self imposed decree.

 

I will be doing things a little differently this time around. First of all, I am allowing myself no ties. There were about 120 movies on the original list. This time I am challenging myself to not cop out with ties. Secondly, I am allowing myself one cop out. There are a few occasions where you’ll see movie series or trilogies sharing one spot. I feel justified in doing so with the movies affected. And finally, rather than doing the list in 10 film increments, I will be doing it in 5. This will keep each entry shorter and more reader friendly, or maybe sometimes it’ll give me the freedom to be more verbose if I feel the inclination.

 

Just a little about my “process”…..
You’ll notice that this is a list of my 100 Favorite Movies. This is NOT a list of the 100 Greatest Films of all time. There’s a huge difference. I’m a diverse, eclectic guy. I like a little of everything. A lot depends on my mood. Sometimes I want to laugh and be goofy. Sometimes I‘m deep and introspective. My entertainment spectrum runs far and wide. I’m also a non-conformist. Just because some film critic says a movie is horrible doesn’t mean I might not enjoy it immensely, and just because the masses put a supposedly great work of art up on a pedestal doesn’t mean I will automatically think it’s worthy of my praise. Awards mean nothing to me either. How many Best Picture winners in the past 20 years have really been THAT good?? In my opinion less than half. One other consideration that carries considerable weight for me is time. I’m extremely wary and almost arrogantly dismissive of anyone who says their absolute favorite film is something that’s been produced in the past five years. Greatness takes time. I look at how well something has withstood the passage of the years.

 

We’ll begin with a short list of movies that I like but just didn’t make the final cut. Next time…same bat time, same bat channel.